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Wednesday Wink - How to Better Communicate Your Prices to Your Client

Client Billing

3 min read

Posted by Maryann Matykowski on October 18, 2017

In today's post, we are going to tackle the very important issue of communication - between you and your client! Let's focus on how to charge for our services and how to communicate clearly about our prices to avoid any uncomfortable surprises. We're not doing a good job if our clients are leaving our salons or studios unhappy... They may love our work, but if we are overcharging or are not clear on what we expect we can cause confusion and criticism.

Transparent Pricing

Here are five steps to ensure your prices are easily available to and understood by your client:
  1. Have a clearly defined price menu
  2. Have a description of each service (length of time, lashes to be added, after care, etc)
  3. Take time to explain how to care for their service when they go home
  4. Explain how you price a fill, and what is included in that price
  5. COMMUNICATE!
Most of us in the beauty industry have experienced that shocked look on our client's face when they get a bill for a service that is way more than they expected. This can be embarrassing for your client, especially if they aren’t prepared to pay an amount they weren’t expecting.

Is It a Fill or a Full Set?

We all have those clients who can be a bit needy and just expect to get more. Communication is the best way to handle every scenario! In my own salon, I give every new client an info sheet. I explain what a full set is, how long it takes, and the steps involved. For my fills I do the same - a full explanation of the service, the length of the service and the steps. I also include all the after care instructions. In bold, highlighted script, I explain that if my client comes back with less than 40% of her extensions intact, we are not doing a fill. We are doing a full set! I will also hold a conversation on how they are caring for their extensions at home, review any ongoing issues, and resolve them before we continue. In some cases, I will offer a re-set price. This is for my regular clients who may have had a blow-out on their lashes - maybe allergies, or crying due to a trauma in their life. I will offer them a reduced price for these occasions.

The Re-Lash Fee

Now, let’s have the really hard conversation... For all of you who have had a client come in with three lashes left on each eye and think they are getting a fill:
  • Ask them what happened
  • Ask them what products they were using
  • Get to the bottom of the issue, resolve it, and explain your policies before proceeding.
Here's an example of how I handle the situation: "Hi Jenny, I noticed you had some issues with your lashes this time around. Can you give me some insight into what happened?" If the client can tell me they were suffering from a cold, allergies or a life trauma, then it wasn’t my glue or other factors... And, if they are a good client, I will do a re-lash set at a reduced fee. I always let them know it will be a re-lash fee, and ask them if they are prepared to pay for that service before I start. If not, I would then remove the few lashes left on and wish them well.

Set Your Price Before You Set Those Lashes!

You cannot and should not ever do a service without discussing the price of the service with your client if it is going to be different from the price they were expecting. It is unprofessional, and will have clients bashing you on social media. Once that happens, it’s almost impossible to correct the issue. So, have the conversation about prices first. If you do, you will never have to try and fix things after the fact. Let's hear from you Glad Lash guys and gals... Do you offer a re-lash fee? How do you handle the tricky scenarios? I hope you've found my advice helpful, please let us know your thoughts!

Maryann Matykowski

Maryann Matykowski

Maryann has an accomplished, 30+ year background in the beauty industry. As a cosmetologist she opened her first salon in ’83. She has specialized as an educator since 2006. Maryann knows what it takes to create successful salon businesses and is here to share her experience with you.


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